Hearing Services

When hearing loss sets in, it’s important to preserve your hearing health with the best in technologies. At the same time, protecting your hearing over a lifetime is one of the best ways to ensure you stay healthy, active, and present in your later years. That’s why our team offers a selection of state-of-the-art hearing solutions and care options to ensure you have everything you need to enjoy your favorite sounds in life. Our best hearing solutions include:

Schedule a Consultation

The best way to get started on your customized hearing solutions is by meeting with our team of Doctors of Audiology with the right experience in hearing technologies. To schedule a consultation, we invite you to contact our Livingston office by calling or filling out our online form.

 

Are Audiologists real doctors?

Yes. An Audiologist is a licensed healthcare professional who specializes in diagnosing and treating hearing, balance and tinnitus disorders in adults and children. An Audiologist who holds a doctoral degree in Audiology (Au. D.) has completed an Au.D. program which includes three years of didactic and clinical instruction and a one-year externship, similar to a medical residency. An Audiologist who completes an Au.D. program holds the title of a Doctor of Audiology.

Can a hearing test damage your hearing?

No, a hearing test cannot damage your hearing.

Can an audiologist diagnose an ear infection?

An Audiologist is able to confirm the presence of an ear infection through otoscopic inspection in conjunction with performing a test of your middle ear function (called a tympanogram). This medical test, referred to as Tympanometry, allows the Audiologist to measures the function and movement of the eardrum and middle ear thus confirming the presence or absence of fluid.

Can an audiologist diagnose tinnitus?

Trained Audiologists have specific tools and clinical protocols to evaluate and diagnose tinnitus. The first step in diagnosing tinnitus is to perform an inventory test to measure the subjective burden a patient experiences because of their tinnitus.nBecause tinnitus is often caused by hearing loss, the Audiologist will then perform a comprehensive audiological evaluation that measures the patient's overall hearing health. After the comprehensive audiological evaluation has been performed, the Audiologist will measure the patient's subjective perception of tinnitus sound, pitch, and volume. Additional objective measurements to evaluate the middle ear should also be performed including the Tympanogram, Acoustic Reflex Testing and Otoacoustic Emission Testing. By completing a comprehensive Tinnitus Evaluation, the Audiologist will be able to work with the patient to develop a comprehensive treatment plan.

How do I train to be an audiologist?

In order to become an Audiologist, you will need to earn a doctoral degree in audiology (Au.D) which is a four-year graduate program that you can enter once you have a bachelor’s degree in any field. Often, Au.D. programs have specific requirements to apply including completed coursework in Speech and Hearing/Communication Sciences. nnOnce enrolled in the Au.D. program, for the first two years, students will complete coursework, observational learning, clinical orientation, written exams and practical assessments. During the third and fourth year, students will have more hands-on experience through internships, externships and other “capstone” style intensive projects.nnUpon graduation, students will need to apply for state licensure in order to practice within the field of Audiology. Requirements for licensure vary from state-to-state. While certification is voluntary, it can be an important to obtain credentials from governing audiology organizations such as the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the American Board of Audiology.

Can an audiologist treat tinnitus?

Trained Audiologists have specific tools and clinical protocols to evaluate and diagnose tinnitus. The first step in treating tinnitus is to perform an inventory test to measure the subjective burden a patient experiences because of their tinnitus.nBecause tinnitus is often caused by hearing loss, the Audiologist will then perform a comprehensive audiological evaluation that measures the patient's overall hearing health. After the comprehensive audiological evaluation has been performed, the Audiologist will measure the patient's subjective perception of tinnitus sound, pitch, and volume. Additional objective measurements to evaluate the middle ear should also be performed including the Tympanogram, Acoustic Reflex Testing and Otoacoustic Emission Testing. By completing a comprehensive Tinnitus Evaluation, the Audiologist will be able to work with the patient to develop a comprehensive treatment plan.

Can an audiologist write prescriptions?

No, an audiologist cannot write prescriptions for medications that are filled by a pharmacist.

Do audiologists go to medical school?

No. An Audiologist has earned a doctoral degree in audiology (Au.D). which is a four-year graduate program that you can enter once you have a bachelor’s degree in any field.

How is an audiology test done?

An audiology test or hearing evaluation is a comprehensive examination performed by a licensed Audiologist. A comprehensive hearing evaluation should initially begin with a review of your full case history as well as the completion of at least one hearing inventory test to measure the subjective impact hearing has on one's life. After the initial case history has been obtained, objective measurements should be performed to evaluate the middle ear including the Tympanogram, Acoustic Reflex Testing and Otoacoustic Emission Testing. Next, the Audiologist will perform a comprehensive audiological evaluation that measures the patient's overall hearing health. Finally, the results will be explained to the patient.

How long does audiology test take?

A comprehensive hearing evaluation or audiology test should take between thirty minutes to one hour to complete.

Should I go to an audiologist or ENT?

An ENT and an Audiologist often work together to determine the best treatment plan for patients. If you are noticing difficulty hearing, an Audiologist will be able to determine what the nature of your hearing loss is and make the appropriate recommendation for treatment. If you see an Audiologist and they detect the presence of a medical condition within your ear, you would likely be referred to an ENT. If you are experiencing pain or swelling in your ears, then you would want to see your medical doctor or go directly to an ENT, who is a specialist in this area.

What hours do audiologists work?

Audiologists work in many different types of facilities; often between 40–50 hours per week although some Audiologists work part-time. Audiologists frequently work in private practice, with other medical specialists, speech-language pathologists, educators, engineers, scientists, and allied health professionals.

What is the difference between ENT and audiologist?

While an Audiologist only deals with the ears, an ENT doctor treats patients for diseases or conditions of not only of the ears, but also the nose or throat. You should see an Audiologist for diagnosis and treatment of hearing loss and related problems like tinnitus or balance issues. Typically, ENT doctors do not perform comprehensive hearing examinations or treat hearing loss.

What kind of doctor do I need to see for vertigo?

An ENT and an Audiologist often work together to determine the best treatment plan for patients. If you are experiencing vertigo, through vestibular testing, an Audiologist will be able to determine what the nature of your vertigo and make the appropriate recommendation for treatment. If you see an Audiologist and they detect the presence of a medical condition within your ear, you would likely be referred to an ENT.

Do Audiologists treat vertigo?

If you are experiencing vertigo, through vestibular testing, an Audiologist will be able to determine what the nature of your vertigo and make the appropriate recommendation for treatment.

What are the pros and cons of being an audiologist?

Being an Audiologist is very rewarding. US News and World Reports ranks the profession of Audiology among the top healthcare jobs. nnThe PROs of being an audiologist include:nAudiologists are able to help those in need hearnAudiology is a growing professionnAudiologists earn excellent paynnSome CONs of being an audiologist include:nWork can be frustratingnLong Hours and TravelnExtensive education is required

What do they do during a hearing test?

A hearing test or hearing evaluation is a comprehensive examination performed by a licensed Audiologist. A comprehensive hearing evaluation should initially begin with a review of your full case history as well as the completion of at least one hearing inventory test to measure the subjective impact hearing has on one's life. After the initial case history has been obtained, objective measurements should be performed to evaluate the middle ear including the Tympanogram, Acoustic Reflex Testing and Otoacoustic Emission Testing. Next, the Audiologist will perform a comprehensive audiological evaluation that measures the patient's overall hearing health. Finally, the results will be explained to the patient.

What does an audiologist mean?

Au-di-ol-o-gists: Audiologists are licensed healthcare professionals who specialize in diagnosing and treating hearing, balance and tinnitus disorders in adults and children. An Audiologist who holds a doctoral degree in Audiology (Au. D.) has completed an Au.D. program which includes three years of didactic and clinical instruction and a one-year externship, similar to a medical residency. An Audiologist who completes an Au.D. program holds the title of a Doctor of Audiology and is referred to as an audiologist.

What can I expect from an audiologist?

An Audiologist is a licensed healthcare professionals who specializes in diagnosing and treating hearing, balance and tinnitus disorders in adults and children.

What qualifications do you need to be a audiologist?

In order to become an Audiologist, you will need to earn a doctoral degree in audiology (Au.D) which is a four-year graduate program that you can enter once you have a bachelor’s degree in any field. Often, Au.D. programs have specific requirements to apply including completed coursework in Speech and Hearing/Communication Sciences. nnOnce enrolled in the Au.D. program, for the first two years, students will complete coursework, observational learning, clinical orientation, written exams and practical assessments. During the third and fourth year, students will have more hands-on experience through internships, externships and other “capstone” style intensive projects.nnUpon graduation, students will need to apply for state licensure in order to practice within the field of Audiology. Requirements for licensure vary from state-to-state. While certification is voluntary, it can be an important to obtain credentials from governing audiology organizations such as the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the American Board of Audiology. In order to maintain professional licensure, an Audiologist must also be up to date on continuing education requirements.

What kind of doctor do I see for vertigo?

If you are experiencing vertigo, through vestibular testing, an An ENT and an Audiologist often work together to determine the best treatment plan for patients with vertigo. Audiologist will be able to determine what the nature of your vertigo and make the appropriate recommendation for treatment.

What is the difference between an otologist and an audiologist?

An Otologist and an Audiologist often work together to determine the best treatment plan for patients. If you are noticing difficulty hearing, an Audiologist will be able to determine what the nature of your hearing loss is and make the appropriate recommendation for treatment. If you see an Audiologist and they detect the presence of a medical condition within your ear, you would likely be referred to an ENT or Otologist. If you are experiencing pain or swelling in your ears, then you would want to see your medical doctor or go directly to an Otologist or ENT, who is a specialist in this area.